Hub International to Offer Webinar on the Evolving Role of Voluntary Benefits With Health Care Reform

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) April 21, 2014

Hub International Limited (Hub), a leading global insurance brokerage, is presenting a webinar entitled “Health Care Reform Update: Are Voluntary Benefits Changing to Necessary Benefits?”

The webinar will discuss how a voluntary benefits package offers employers a holistic approach to help their employees adapt to the inevitable changes brought on by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

This session will be presented on Wednesday, April 30th, at 2:00 pm EST, by Hub executives, Ron Agypt, Chief Sales Officer, Employee Benefits, and Sibyl Bogardus, Chief Compliance Officer, nationally recognized speakers on the evolution of voluntary benefits with health care reform. The session will cover why voluntary benefits are becoming an essential component in most employers’ post-ACA benefits strategies and how to optimize adoption and usage of these benefits to increase employee satisfaction.

To register for this complimentary webinar, click here. To access Hub International’s on-demand webinars on Health Care Reform, please click here.

Headquartered in Chicago, IL, Hub International Limited is a leading global insurance brokerage that provides property and casualty, life and health, employee benefits, investment and risk management products and services through offices located in the United States, Canada and Brazil.

Media Contact:

Cara Siegel

Hub International Limited

Director of Corporate Brand Management/Media Relations

Phone: 516-677-4992

cara.siegel(at)hubinternational(dot)com







More Risk Management Press Releases

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
Do you want to talk to our chat robot? chat.elmit.com – Very funny!


— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cool Management Stress images

Check out these management stress images:

Brian Voss, UMD’s Incoming VP of IT
management stress

Image by Merrill College of Journalism Press Releases
University of Maryland News
June 9, 2011

Online: newsdesk.umd.edu/universitynews/release.cfm?ArticleID=2444

New UMD VP of Information: Brian Voss, IT Leader in Higher Education
Looks to IT To Gain Strategic Advantage

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland has named Brian D. Voss as its new vice president of information technology (IT) and chief information officer (CIO). His IT experience spans 25 years, much of it spent in leadership positions at public, flagship research universities.

Voss has been active in major national higher education technology initiatives, and is a nationally recognized leader in cybersecurity, cyberinfrastructure, IT strategy and disaster recovery planning. Currently, he serves as Louisiana State University’s (LSU) first-ever vice chancellor for information technology.

Voss begins at Maryland in August 2011.

At LSU for the past six years and at Indiana University for nearly 20 years before that, Voss has been instrumental in the use of IT in transforming the institution’s environment. Among his recent areas of focus at Louisiana, he includes: IT strategic planning and governance; expanding cyberinfrastructure to support emerging research needs, especially in the area of high-performance computing and networking; shifting campus IT services and applications to “the cloud” to improve effectiveness and cut costs; and expanding opportunities for online education and support of classroom teaching and learning.

Voss also was involved in the LSU effort to aid recovery in Louisiana following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and gained recognition nationally for his experiences in IT disaster planning.

"Information technology is the central nervous system of a major public research institution, and vital to our statewide service mission," says University of Maryland President Wallace Loh. "Brian’s experience, approach and leadership will keep us on the path to a first-class information technology infrastructure. We’re fortunate to have someone of Brian’s stature at the helm."

Philosophically, Voss describes himself as a believer in “user-centric, community-driven IT planning and governance,” implemented with a “nurturing leadership style.” He embraces the principle of “IT abundance” – providing an environment that features advanced technology readily available to the university community. Also, Voss advocates “humanware” – ensuring that investments in hardware and software are well supported by the human resources needed to get the most value possible from the IT environment.

“All areas of IT must be addressed to help the institution move forward; no one area can be addressed at the expense of another,” Voss stresses.

On the national stage, Voss has actively collaborated with other higher education institutions and organizations, particularly on issues of cybersecurity and cyberinfrastructure. He has served on key advisory boards, councils, management groups, as well as organizations such as EDUCAUSE, Internet2, ACUTA, Campus Technology, Microsoft, and REN-ISAC.

Among his accomplishments, Voss includes his role securing over -million in funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the past decade, helping both IU and LSU become part of the national Teragrid – an NSF network extending high-performance computing.

Voss led efforts at LSU to adopt the open source Moodle Learning Management system, helping teachers create instructional web sites and doing so on a large scale without increasing costs. While at Indiana, he helped pioneer the campus/enterprise software licensing model – with Microsoft as the prime example – providing access to a broad suite of products for the entire campus community; this model is widely used today and benefits many universities nationally.

His publications span the IT discipline, including IT support models and best practices; campus networking (wireless and wired infrastructure) and regional and national optical networking; disaster recovery and campus crisis notification; cyberinfrastructure for research; cybersecurity and policy; and IT leadership.

“The pace of technological advance, as well as growing challenges, such as cybersecurity, demand that universities like Maryland remain lithe, responsive and yet prudent in their deployment of IT,” Voss adds. “I am very pleased to join the Maryland team, as I believe President Loh and the campus community grasps the critical role that IT plays in the strategic advance of a public, flagship, research university in the 21st century.”

Voss will succeed interim IT vice president and CIO Joseph JaJa, and the late Jeffrey Huskamp.

See Voss’ bio here: newsdesk.umd.edu/vibrant/vossbio.cfm

MEDIA CONTACT:

Neil Tickner
Senior Media Relations Associate
University of Maryland
301-405-4622
ntickner@umd.edu

A stem of Commelina benghalensis …Một nhánh cây Thài Lài lông, Trai đầu rìu …
management stress

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Blue-flowered Commelina species such as Commelina benghalensis and Commelina diffusa Burm.f. are easily confused.

Vietnamese named : Thài Lài lông, Trai Đầu Rìu
English names : Benghal dayflower
Scientist name : Commelina benghalensis L.
Synonyms : Commelina canescens Vahl, Commelina cucullata L., Commelina delicatula Schltdl., Commelina kilimandscharica K. Schum., Commelina mollis Jacq., Commelina nervosa Burm. f., Commelina procurrens Schltdl., Commelina prostrata Regel, Commelina pyrrhoblepharis Hassk. (1867), Commelina turbinata Vahl
Family : Commelinaceae. Họ Thài Lài ( Họ Trai )

Searched from :

**** TRUNG TÂM DỮ LIỆU THỰC VẬT VIETNAM
botanyvn.com/cnt.asp?param=edir&v=Commelina%20benghal…

Tên Khoa học: Commelina benghalensis L. 1753 (CCVN, 3: 461)
Tên tiếng Anh:
Tên tiếng Việt: Thài lài lông; Đầu rìu
Tên khác: C. cucullata L. 1771. (FC:39)

**** VHO.VN.
www.vho.vn/view.htm?ID=786&keyword=Phổi

Thài lài lông, Ðầu riều, Trai ấn – Commelina benghalensis L., thuộc họ Thài lài – Commelinaceae.

Mô tả: Cây thảo sống lâu năm, mọc bò lan trên mặt đất, thân cành nhiều, dài tới 70cm hay hơn, có lông. Lá mọc so le, hình bầu dục thuôn, dài 8-12cm, rộng 3-3,5cm, chóp lá có đuôi, bẹ có rìa lông. Trên nhánh ở đất, hoa ngậm, vàng vàng, ở nhánh đứng, cụm hoa có vài chùm ít hoa, hoa lam có 3 nhị sinh sản. Quả nang cao 6mm, 2 ô 4 hạt.

Bộ phận dùng: Toàn cây – Herba Commelinae Benghalensis.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Thài lai lông phân bố rộng rãi ở các vùng nhiệt đới của châu Á và châu Phi. Ở nước ta, cây mọc phổ biến ở khắp nơi, chỗ ẩm mát, trên các bãi đất hoang, hoặc ven rừng thưa, ven suối ẩm.

Thành phần hóa học: Người ta đã biết thành phần dinh dưỡng của Thài lài lông gồm chất khô 16,5%, protein 2,21%, lipid 0,31%, glucid 8,77%, cellulose 1,35% và khoáng toàn phần 3,86%; có caroten 1,6mg% và vitamin C 48,3mg%.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Vị đắng, tính hàn, có tác dụng thanh nhiệt giải độc, lợi niệu, tiêu thũng, có tính làm dịu, nhuận tràng.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Thài lài lông có ngọn và lá non, vò kỹ, thái nhỏ, luộc hay nấu canh ăn; trâu bò và lợn cũng thích ăn rau này, nhất là trâu bò cái mới sinh.

Ở Ấn Độ, người ta dùng cây chữa bệnh phong hủi.

Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc) cây được dùng trị trẻ em viêm phổi, tiểu tiện bất lợi, mụn nhọt lở ngứa.

**** VIETGLE
www1.vietgle.vn/trithucviet/detail.aspx?key=benghalensis&…

Commelina benghalensis L. – Thài lài lông, Cỏ đầu rìu.
Cỏ cao 30 – 60m. Rễ chùm. Thân phân nhánh bén rễ ở các mấu. Lá dài 2 – 6cm, rộng 1 – 3cm, hình bầu dục; bẹ lá hình ống hẹp.
Cụm hoa là chùm thưa hoa, 2 – 4 hoa bao bọc trong các mo; gần gốc có mo ít phát triển, chứa hoa không nở, sinh quả nang chín ở dưới đất. Lá đài 3, màu vàng rồi màu xanh. Cánh hoa 3 hoặc 2, màu thanh thiên hay trắng, 3 nhị sinh sản; bao phấn 2 ô nứt dọc; 3 nhị không sinh sản hoặc 3 nhị lép cấu tạo bởi một phiến hình cánh hoa có 2 thùy. Vòi hình trụ, khá to. Quả nang 3 ô; 2 ô ở phía bụng, mỗi ô đựng 4 hạt; ô ở phía lưng hình lòng thuyền đựng 1 hạt. Hạt hình khối nhiều mặt, vỏ hạt có nếp uốn lượn ở mặt ngoài, có mào dọc màu nâu ở mặt trong.

Phân bố rộng rãi ở các vùng nhiệt đới và cận nhiệt đới của châu Á và châu Phi. Ở nước ta, cây mọc khắp nơi từ Lào Cai, Lạng Sơn cho tới thành phố Hồ Chí Minh.
Thường gặp ở chỗ ẩm mát, trên các bãi đất hoang, ven rừng thưa, ven suối ẩm, trong sân vườn và dọc đường đi.
Ra hoa vào mùa hạ và mùa thu.
Thài lài lông có ngọn và lá non, vò kỹ, thái nhỏ, luộc hay nấu canh ăn; trâu bò và lợn cũng thích ăn rau này, nhất là trâu bò cái mới sinh.
Ở Ấn Độ, người ta dùng cây chữa bệnh phong hủi.
Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc), cây được dùng trị trẻ em viêm phổi, tiểu tiện bất lợi, mụn nhọt lở ngứa.

____________________________________________________________

**** ISSG.ORG.
www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=1367&fr=…

Taxonomic name: Commelina benghalensis L.
Synonyms: Commelina canescens Vahl, Commelina cucullata L., Commelina delicatula Schltdl., Commelina kilimandscharica K. Schum., Commelina mollis Jacq., Commelina nervosa Burm. f., Commelina procurrens Schltdl., Commelina prostrata Regel, Commelina pyrrhoblepharis Hassk. (1867), Commelina turbinata Vahl

Organism type: herb
Believed to be native only to tropical Asia and Africa, Commelina benghalensis is a widely distributed herbaceous weed that commonly invades agricultural sites and disturbed areas. Though not commonly reported to invade natural areas, this rapidly reproducing plant is considered one of the most troublesome weeds for 25 crops in 29 different countries.

Description
Commelina benghalensis can be an annual or perennial herb. Leaves are ovate to lancolate, 2.5-7.5cm long, 1.5-4cm wide, with parallel veination, entire leaf margins, and pubescence on top and bottom. The leaf sheath is covered in red and sometimes white hairs at the apex which is a primary identification factor for this species. Stems can be erect or crawling along the ground rooting at the nodes or climbing if supported, 10-30cm in height, 20-90cm in length, covered in a fine pubescence and dichotomously branched. Flowers are produced in spathes often found in clusters, funnel shaped, fused by two sides, 10-20 mm long, 10-15 mm wide, on peduncles 1-3.5 mm in length. Aerial flowers are staminate, perfect, and chasmogamous with 3 petals 3-4 mm long. The upper two flower petals are blue to lilac in color, with the lower petal lighter in color or white and much less prominent. Seeds are rectangular, 1.6-3 mm in length, 1.3-1.8 mm wide, brown to black in color, and have a netted appearance (Prostko, 2005; Webster et al., 2005).

Similar Species
Commelina spp., Commelina virginica

Uses
In Africa and India the leaves and stems of Commelina benghalensis are chopped and cooked as vegetables and used as feed for livestock. Different components of C. benghalensis are also used as a medicinal for ailments such as sore feet, sore throat, burns, eye irritation, thrush in infants, and stomach irritation. In southern Africa, C. benghalensis is used to combat infertility (van der Burg, 2004).

Management information
Preventative measures: Preventing dense populations of Commelina benghalensis from establishing in agricultural areas helps avoid the accumulation of large seed banks. Cultivation of a cover crop can be used to smother emerging and established populations of C. benghalensis, however mechanical or chemical removal may be needed prior to planting the cover crop. Increasing the density of plants in soybeans and doubling rows in corn helps control and shade out C. benghalensis (Flanders, 2007; NAPPO, 2003; Prostko, 2005).
Physical: Removal by pulling or use of a tool such as a hoe, or mechanical cultivation have a varying, but usually low, degree of success due to the regenerative properties of C. benghalensis. In one study, comparing conventional tillage to strip tillage, conventional tillage was shown to have a much lower density (3 plants/m2 versus 60 plants/m2) of C. benghalensis in a weed count performed after peanuts and cotton were planted (Brecke, 2007; NAPPO, 2003).

Chemical: The use of herbicides with residual activity to combat C. benghalensis is often most effective because of the weed’s ability to germinate through out the growing season. C. benghalensis is resistant to glyphosphate in "Roundup Ready" cotton . In one study, adding metachlor to the first glyphosphate application increased control to 96% under conventional tillage and 75% under strip tillage with 50% soil disturbance. According to Prostko (2005), "Dual Magnum" is the most effective residual herbicide to control C. benghalensis in cotton crops. Prostko also suggests "Dual Magnum" application in peanuts for successful suppression, especially if at least 0.5 inches of rain or irrigation is received within 7-10 days. Early post-emergence applications of herbicide should be performed before seedlings of C. benghalensis reach 3-4 inches (Brecke, 2007; Flanders, 2007).

Integrated management: Pieces of cut stems of C. benghalensis, usually cut during physical eradication or cultivation, have the ability to survive a short period of drought stress and resprout. Stem segments must desiccate to a moisture content of 50% for a period of 30 days to reach a 0% regeneration rate, however the size of the stem segment may lengthen the period of viability (Grey, 2007).

Nutrition
In its native range, Commelina benghalensis is a rainy season weed which requires moist soil conditions for establishment. Once established it has a high drought tolerance. C. benghalensis grows well on all soil types of variable pH and moisture levels (NAPPO, 2003; Webster et al., 2005).

Reproduction
Commelina benghalensis acts as a herbaceous perennial in its native range and as an annual weed in the southeastern United States. Propagation of C. benghalensis can be both sexual and vegetative, and can possess both aerial and subterranean flowers. Aerial flowers are chasmogamous and self fertilizing, producing one large seed and 4 small. Subterranean flowers are cleistogamous (self fertilizing and do not open), producing one large seed and two small. C. benghalensis has the ability to germinate throughout the growing season. The rate of reproduction of this plant rivals that of any agronomic weed (Prostko, 2005; Webster et al., 2005).
Lifecycle stages
Commelina benghalensis grows as a perennial in tropical climates and as an annual in the temperate United States. This difference in lifecycle can be associated with a difference in ploidy levels, with tropical C. benghalensis being hexaploid and temperate being diploid. Tropical hexaploid plants rarely have subterranean flowers. C. benghalensis can produce seeds within 40-45 days of emergence and has multiple generations per year. Subterranean flowers develop about 6 weeks after emergence, aerial flowers develop about 8-10 weeks after emergence. Fruits are produced within 3 days after flowering, with viable seeds within 25 days after flowering. There are four categories of seeds, large and small aerial and large and small subterranean. Small aerial seeds account for 73-79% of all seeds found. Small aerial seeds have a stronger dormancy than large. Clipping the seed coat or exposing the seeds to temperatures in excess off 90 degrees Celsius for 2 hours removed dormancy for all seeds. The optimal temperature for germination of aerial seeds is 18-25 degrees Celsius and 21-28 degrees Celsius for subterranean seeds. The optimal depth for emergence is 2 inches, with larger seeds emerging from depths up to 6 inches (Flanders, 2007; Prostko, 2005; Webster et al., 2005).

**** HEAR ORG.
www.hear.org/starr/images/image/?q=040410-0079&o=plants

**** DATABASE PROTA
database.prota.org/PROTAhtml/Commelina%20benghalensis_En.htm

Uses
In parts of West Africa, e.g. Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, the leaves of Commelina benghalensis are cooked and eaten as a vegetable. The leaves are mucilagenous. In Kenya young leaves are eaten as a relish; older leaves are regarded as too acidic and bitter to use. In Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania the leaves and stems are chopped and cooked alone or with other vegetables such as Bidens pilosa L. or Cleome hirta Oliv. It is also reported as a vegetable in Ethiopia. In Indonesia the leaves and young tops are occasionally steamed and eaten as a vegetable, and in the Philippines they are eaten cooked. In India the leaves are eaten as famine food.
In Sudan and eastern Africa the plants are grazed by domestic stock, at the same time providing part of the cattle’s need for water. In northern Ghana it is a favourite feed for pigs and poultry; in Tanzania it is given to animals, especially pigs and rabbits. The flowers provide bee forage. In southern Africa however, its use as pig feed is restricted to times of scarcity as it is thought to cause a sort of ‘measles’ in the animals. There may be edaphic or genetic differences causing such differences in properties, but these may also originate from misidentifications, because most Commelina species resemble each other very closely.
In southern Nigeria the plant is used as a poultice for sore feet. In East Africa the sap of Commelina benghalensis leaves and stems is used to treat ophthalmia, sore throat and burns, and the liquid contained in the flowering spathe is used to treat eye complaints in Zanzibar. In Uganda and Tanzania the sap is used topically against thrush in infants, and in Tanzania a solution of pounded leaves soaked in warm water to treat diarrhoea. In southern Africa Commelina benghalensis is used to counter infertility in women, and a decoction of the root is used for the relief of stomach disorders. In India it is said to be beneficial for leprosy, and in the Philippines it is used as an emollient suppository for strangury. In Rajasthan (India) sheep with jaundice are treated with a mixture of the plant with whey and common salt.
The rhizomes are starchy and mucilaginous. In India and Sudan they are commonly cooked and eaten, and are said to be a wholesome food. In India and China a dye is obtained from the sap of the flowers.

Properties
Dry leaves of a sample of Commelina benghalensis from Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire, contained per 100 g: protein 13.6 g, fat 2.1 g, carbohydrate 58 g, fibre 41 g (Busson, 1965). All aboveground parts are astringent and contain hydrocyanic acid. Commelina benghalensis has given negative results in tests for antibacterial effects.

The Army examines programs for military Families 091013
management stress

Image by familymwr
PHOTO CAPTION: The 600-plus crowd of Soldiers, Family members and guests, along with about 500 Family Readiness Group leaders from across the Army filled one of the large meeting rooms at this year’s AUSA meeting and exposition at the Washington Convention Center. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs.)

www.armymwr.com

The Army examines programs for military Families 091013

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

WASHINGTON, DC – “Never before have we asked our Families to do so much,” Brig. Gen. Reuben Jones, FMWRC commanding general told more than 600 Family members, Soldiers and guests at the AUSA 2009 Meeting and Exposition.

The second and third days of the AUSA Family Forum series brought Army and civilian leaders together to examine the progress of its existing programs, such as Comprehensive Soldier Fitness, benefits through the Veterans Affairs, outreach to veterans of OIE and OEF, Franklin Covey’s Power pilot program and the Military Child and Adolescent Center of Excellence.

Community partners who embrace Soldiers and their Families presented briefings about their programs, as well. These included Project Home Front, Operation Give a Hug, Azalea Charities and INOVA

“Our Families are showing stress,” Jones said. “We know the strength of our Soldiers comes from the strength of our Families, as Gen. Wickham so eloquently said.”

Retired Gen. John A. Wickham Jr., former Army Chief of Staff and former Secretary of the Army John Marsh signed the white paper "The Army Family" on Aug. 15, 1983 because they wanted to increase funding and oversight of programs like child development centers, family counseling and suicide prevention.

“Yesterday, Secretary of the Army John McHugh, Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey, Jr., and Sgt. Maj. of the Army Kenneth O. Preston reaffirmed the Army’s promise to Soldiers and Families by signing the Army Family Covenant – to build resilience in our Soldiers and Families,” Jones said. “Your Army is working to relieve your stress.”

Brig. Gen. Colleen McGuire, director of the Army’s suicide prevention task force, reported on what she called an unfortunate trend — the steady increase in the rate of Army suicides.

The Army has identified a long list of factors that increase the risk of suicide, including: infidelity, alcohol abuse, high-risk driving, multiple drug offenses, use of opiates, sleep deprivation, erratic behavior, compressed dwell times between deployments and undiagnosed PTSD.

“We have the programs, we have relationship counseling, we have drug testing, but we’ve been heavy on the treatment and not on how to deal with the stress,” McGuire said.

McGuire said the Army continues to examine its counseling, drug testing and medical treatment programs to see if they are effective at mitigating those risks and addressing the needs of today’s Soldiers.

Brig. Gen. Rhonda Cornum directs Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF), the Army’s new effort to ensure its Soldiers, Families and DoD civilians are strong mentally, as well as physically. The motto is Strong Minds, Strong Bodies.

“We all know how to perform CPR, the method to revive someone after they suffer a heart attack,” Cornum said. “It’s better, though, if we can prevent that heart attack through exercise and diet and medication. In CSF, that’s what we are doing for behavioral health.

“People enter the service with a wide variety of mental strengths, but we can make them better through good training and good risk preventive maintenance,” Cornum said.

Cornum said this training is most needed by the Army’s recent influx of very young Soldiers who face the complex array of stressors inherent to warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan. These young Soldiers, who enter the Army with varying degrees of mental preparedness, are often asked to accomplish offensive, defensive, stability and civilian support tasks within a very short period of time.

CSF will be available for the entire force beginning this month, and will be available in January 2010 for Families and in March for DoD civilians. The comprehensive effort has four components: an online self-assessment tool, online self-development tools guided by the assessment, resilience training and master resilience training.

But the big issue, said Family Readiness Group (FRG) leaders, was the stigma involved with any behavioral health program.

“There will be no stigma associated with going through CSF training because everyone will have to enter the program which will accompany them throughout their career,” Cornum said.

The Army is also building many partnerships with civilian corporations to make sure services are available for Soldiers and their Families.

Mike Carr, management and program analyst from the Veterans Benefits Administration, explained its five groups of programs: compensation and pension, education and loan guaranty, insurance, vocational rehabilitation and employment.

Some of these benefits and services are available for Active duty Soldiers after they have served for 90 days or 180 days prior to separation and pre-discharge.

Jennifer Perez, acting chief consultant of the office of patient care services, outlined the nationwide VA network of hospitals, vet centers and outpatient clinics, as well as the special programs for OEF (Operation Enduring Freedom) and OIF (Operation Iraqi Freedom) vets, caregivers and Families and the liaison program aimed at coordinating healthcare between the military and the VA.

One unique private-public partnership that serves Family members is the Fisher House program, which serves over 100,000 Families annually for free so they can be in a home away from home and be close to a loved one during the hospitalization for an unexpected illness, disease or injury.

Alfonso R. Batres, chief officer of the readjustment counseling service at the Department of Veterans Affairs Vet Center program, described the confidential counseling services available for veterans and their Families at vet centers and provided contact info: www.vetcenter.va.gov or 866-644-5371.

“Vet Centers began in 1979 to serve Vietnam vets but now we’re at the forefront of research into PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder),” Batres said. “Usually, though, it’s not the vet who comes in by himself, he’s brought in by a Family member because they’re the first ones to see the changes.”

Vet Centers provide readjustment counseling and outreach services to all veterans who served in any combat zone. Services are also available for their Family members for military-related issues. Veterans have earned these benefits through their service and all are provided at no cost to the veteran or Family.

The 232 community-based Vet Centers are located in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

Preventing caregiver burnout was the subject discussed by Wayne Boswell and Shawn Moon of Franklin Covey. Providing Outreach While Enhancing Readiness (POWER) is a new program for chaplains, teachers, medical providers and others who support Soldiers experiencing compassion fatigue.

“The needs of caregivers are not addressed enough,” Boswell, who leads the Compassion fatigue program, said. “They are burned out and struggling with the new norm and they’re asking for helps. Who in here has scheduled time for themselves?”

About half of the more than 600-member audience raised their hands.

“You’re lying,” Boswell said. “But we’re here to help by training the trainers, assessing the baseline of individuals and implementing a method to build resilience.”

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101206

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
Do you want to talk to our chat robot? chat.elmit.com – Very funny!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Mavado – Real McKoy


Mavado – Real McKoy

from Anger Management

Price: USD 0.99
View Details about Mavado

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
You’re invited to join Dropbox! – Simplify your life with Dropbox

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Is there free help with anger management?

Question by Christopher S: Is there free help with anger management?

Best answer:

Answer by Mike F
Yeah, it is called counting to 10.

It is real easy and free: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10……..

IF that does not work, count down backwards…..

What do you think? Answer below!

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
You’re invited to join Dropbox! – Simplify your life with Dropbox

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Spy vs Sci 688

A few nice stress test images I found:

Spy vs Sci 688
stress test

Image by Anonymous9000
LULZY Anon on the left demonstrates the proper leaning back "pimp walk".

July 12 was the 6th straight month of peaceful GLOBAL protests against the malicious cult-corporation of scientology. This month’s theme is "Spy vs Sci: License to LULZ". The goal is to educate the public about the Scientology Cult’s very own intelligence division, The Office of Special Affairs or (OSA).

DOES YOUR CHURCH HAVE AN INTELLIGENCE DIVISION?

In the 70′s the early OSA, known as the Guardian Office, was responsible for Operation Snow White, the largest case of domestic espionage to ever occur in the USA. But it wasn’t limited to the US, government agencies were broken in to and documents stolen from 19 countries around the world. LRon Hubbard’s wife and nine others went to federal prison for their crimes, while Hubbard lived the rest of his life a hunted man on the run from the authorities.

Google Operation Snow White

All faces of those unmasked are blurred to protect them from the cult’s "Fair Game" policy of harassing it’s critics. These are brave people of all ages and walks of life, standing shoulder to shoulder with ex-Scientologists to bring the truth TO YOU.

Educate yourself about what TIME Magazine called "The Cult of Greed and Power":
www.whyweprotest.net
www.enturbulation.org

Operation Clambake 192
stress test

Image by Anonymous9000
Operation Clambake on July 18, 2009 in Clearwater, Florida marked the 18th month of peaceful global protests in cities around the world against the malicious cult/corporation of scientology.

In keeping with the clambake theme, Hawaiian shirts, decorations and leis were on hand.

In this recent St. Petersburg Times expose’ you can read for yourself how the cult leader David Miscavige encourages and perpetrates fear and violence among the cult’s staff, which trickles down to all aspects of scientology:
www.tampabay.com/specials/2009/reports/project/

All faces of those unmasked are blurred to protect them from the cult’s "Fair Game" policy of harassing it’s critics. These are brave people of all ages and walks of life, standing shoulder to shoulder with ex-Scientologists to bring the truth TO YOU.

But don’t take my word for it, educate yourself about what TIME Magazine called "The Cult of Greed and Power":
www.whyweprotest.net
www.xenu.net
www.exscientologykids.com

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
Visit our online store at shop.elmit.com.
— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Can my apartment management include premiums of renters insurance on my rent ?

Question by Jake: Can my apartment management include premiums of renters insurance on my rent ?
The complex I live in requires that each tenant have renters insurance because the management suffered losses from damages as a result of the tenants’ negligence. I want to have the freedom to choose the company that I buy it from — but they want to increase my rent in order to cover for the premiums. The management company in turn buys a policy for each unit. Can they do that ? I live in California.

Best answer:

Answer by XYZ
Only if it is in your lease.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
Visit our online store at shop.elmit.com.
— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

- The Increasing Role of Technology, Law Risk Management, New Fee Structures and Non-Traditional Labor in Increasing Access to Ju


– The Increasing Role of Technology, Law Risk Management, New Fee Structures and Non-Traditional Labor in Increasing Access to Ju

from Social Justice Tuesdays

Price:
View Details about

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
You’re invited to join Dropbox! – Simplify your life with Dropbox
Local Online Advertising
Local Coupon Advertising

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DISCcert Announces 2 Day DISC Certification Trainer Program May 29th & 30th

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) April 09, 2014

DISCcert, a nationally recognized training company located in San Diego has announced its next two-day DISC Certification Trainer Program that will take place May 29th and 30th, 2014. Corporate trainers, managers and HR professionals will take part in the comprehensive DISC training curriculum and will be provided with tools and techniques that they can instantly implement. The two-day classroom is designed to certify trainers to teach DISC and use it as a tool for many applications. Learning Activities, PowerPoint presentations and lesson plans supply a trainer with DISC materials that can be used effectively for coaching, training, and organizational development.

DISCcert’s objective is to empower trainers to teach DISC with confidence and competence. The training curriculum is both practical as well as engaging. Participants will not only learn DISC for their own professional career development, but will also have the opportunity to develop a more positive and productive culture within their organization by teaching it to managers and employees. Attendees will discover how DISC can be used for team building, executive coaching, management skills, conflict resolution, and sales training. Additional DISC applications include conflict resolution, change management, customer service, on-boarding and performance development.

“A leader certified in DISC provides vast value for any company,” shares Miss Burn. “When staff and employees are able to work together more cohesively and customer service improves, it’s a win win for all.”

For more information, and to register for the 2 Day DISC Certification Program in May, please visit:

http://www.disccert.com/store/class-registration/

DISCcert offers three options for a comprehensive DISC certification program: the two-day classroom format, the in-house program and now the four-part webinar series. All three options enable organizations to save money by capitalizing on their internal training talent. The past and present financial stress has caused many organizations to reduce their training budgets and search out options for capitalizing on their in-house human resource expertise. Becoming DISC certified through DISCcert has been the choice of organizations nationwide.

DISC certified graduates who have taken the DISCcert program quickly learn how to use the most practical DISC training tools for optimum results. As a result, trainers are able to successfully launch DISC at their organizations, as well as easily implement a reinforcement strategy to ensure ongoing positive progress and development.

Bonnie Burn is a 30-year master corporate trainer and author of Assessment A to Z, Jossey-Bass Publishing. Her expertise as a professional DISC expert and corporate trainer have led her to design the most up-to-date and comprehensive DISC Certification Program available. Through her company, DISCcert, business trainers and HR training professionals can easily gain confidence in knowing how to successfully teach DISC throughout their entire organization.

Burn is committed to ensuring that all DISC trainers and HR professionals are successful with their training in the short and long term. Here is a sampling of what one graduate is saying: “At the end of the program you will feel confident and prepared to effectively use the tool to coach and develop employees at all levels.” Others can be found at Success Stories. She has trained over 420,000 people in corporate, government and non-profit organizations.

DISCcert offers one of the nation’s leading DISC certification programs with three options for becoming DISC certified: a classroom program, an in-house session, and a live webinar format. Burn envisioned a DISC training resource company that provided practical coaching for trainers prior to, during and after the achievement of DISC certification.

The sessions are positive, engaging, empowering and an ongoing learning experience. The professionally-prepared PowerPoint presentations, lesson plans, leader’s guides, and learning activities are designed so that each company or organization can customize them to fit their specific needs. In addition, DISC certified graduates receive 24/7 access to more than 200 DISC training resources, LinkedIn DISCcert Trainers’ Group and automated weekly DISC Tips.







Find More Management Stress Press Releases

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
You’re invited to join Dropbox! – Simplify your life with Dropbox
Local Online Advertising
Local Coupon Advertising


— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Nice Management Stress photos

Check out these management stress images:

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
management stress

Image by familymwr

www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
You’re invited to join Dropbox! – Simplify your life with Dropbox
— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How to manage the risk as the project manager?

Question by Poor: How to manage the risk as the project manager?
hey,
anyone can tell me how to manage the risk as the project manager (ex: online hotel management system)
thank you

Best answer:

Answer by TruthMastaT
There are a few things involved in managing project risk:

1. Define Risk
The difference between a “risk” and an “issue” is as follows:

a) Issue – A problem that you as the PM cannot do anything about but somebody else (your boss perhaps) can do something about. Therefore, issues should be logged and escalated to the person who can address or eliminate them.

b) Risk – A potential problem that nobody can do anything about. A risk, by definition, is just there. You can’t remove it. If you could, it would be an issue. But you must think about the risk and prepare for it in case it occurs.

2. Log the Risk
Just as a PM would keep an Issues Log, you must keep a Risk Log. Record all of the risks that you and your team can think of.

3. Prioritize the Risks
Prioritizing risks involves analyzing two things:
a. How likely is the risk to happen?
b. To what extent would the risk adversely affect the project if it occurred?

If you establish a scale of 1 to 100 in terms of adversity (1 being almost no effect; 100 being an utter disaster) and establish the probability of the risk somewhere between 0% and 100%, you can produce a risk index or score. For example, if the risk would score 70 on the “adverse effect” scale but it only has a 10% chance of happening, that risk would score 7 (10% of 70). If another risk scored 40 on the “adverse effect” scale and had a 50% chance of happening, that risk would score 20 (50% of 40). Even though 70 is worse than 40, the lower probability means that it would likely be a waste of time to spend much time and attention on something that is so unlikely to happen.

4. Develop a Risk Mitigation Plan

After you have logged and prioritized your risks, you must develop a Risk Mitigation Plan for each risk in accordance with its effect and probability. In other words, a risk with a high score would demand you and/or your team to spend some time thinking through and documenting a plan to mitigate the risk whereas a risk with a low score may only require a cursory thought of what you would need to do if the risk were to occur.

5. Execute the Risk Mitigation Plan (if necessary)

Remember, by definition, risks cannot be eliminated; they can only be mitigated. Therefore, a risk with a high score may require you to execute your risk mitigation plan for that risk (as opposed to just having a plan waiting in the wings “just in case”).

6. Monitor and Manage the Risk Log and Risk Mitigation Plans

It is easy to forget about project risks for at least two reasons: a) you will have other more pressing concerns; b) the risks may never happen. However, it is a good practice to review the Risk Log on a regular basis (perhaps every week) and refine it (add, change or delete items on the Risk Log). It may be appropriate to deputize one of your junior project team members as the “Keeper of the Risk Log” so that you won’t forget to review and manage it.

The Risk Log looks very similar to an Issues Log. I include the following columns in my Risk Logs (which I keep on MS Excel or MS Word):

1. Risk ID Number
2. Risk Name
3. Risk Description (include the potential adverse effects)
4. Date (the date you put it on the log)
5. Identifier (the name of the person who identified it)
6. Probability (in terms of a percentage)
7. Adverse Effect (in terms of a numeric scale; usually 1-10 or 1-100)
8. Risk Score (Probability x Adverse Effect)
9. Mitigating Action (list the actions that you are taking now or will take in the event that the risk occurs)
8. Other Comments

Good luck.

Add your own answer in the comments!

The stress test will show you how relaxed you really are. Remember, the weakest link is YOU!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —
Do you want to talk to our chat robot? chat.elmit.com – Very funny!

— — — x X * Advertisement * X x — — —

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • Blogosphere
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • Google Buzz
  • Identi.ca
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • MSN Reporter
  • Ping.fm
  • Plurk
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment